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Publishing to Maven Central Repository

Here you'll find a short overview of the actions required for publishing your artifacts to Maven Central Repository. The best way to publish your artifacts is using Open Source Software Repository Hosting (OSSRH) which runs Sonatype Nexus Platform. We'll follow the official guide with some remarks.
  1. Get permission for deployment.
  2. Deployment of artifacts.
  3. Release procedure.
Get permission for deployment
In the beginning you need to get permission for deployment under a certain Maven groupId. This should be done by signing up and creating a ticket in Sonatype JIRA. If the groupId already exists, either the initial requester should apply for a new user account or you should demonstrate an approval from the project owners. As a result, you'll get an account in OSSRH.
For example, this is how I requested permission for com.github.dita-ot groupId.

Deployment of artifacts
The deployment is the first phase of artifacts publication. Here you need to create and sign a bundle with artifacts and upload it to a staging repository. This process can be fully automated using popular build tools and made a part of the existing release process. Alternatively, it can also be performed manually.
For example, this is the Batch script I used for deployment:
start mvn gpg:sign-and-deploy-file -Durl=https://oss.sonatype.org/service/local/staging/deploy/maven2/ -DrepositoryId=ossrh -DpomFile=dost-2.1.0.pom -Dfile=dost-2.1.0.jar
start mvn gpg:sign-and-deploy-file -Durl=https://oss.sonatype.org/service/local/staging/deploy/maven2/ -DrepositoryId=ossrh -DpomFile=dost-2.1.0.pom -Dfile=dost-2.1.0-sources.jar -Dclassifier=sources
start mvn gpg:sign-and-deploy-file -Durl=https://oss.sonatype.org/service/local/staging/deploy/maven2/ -DrepositoryId=ossrh -DpomFile=dost-2.1.0.pom -Dfile=dost-2.1.0-javadoc.jar -Dclassifier=javadoc
Release procedure
Releasing is the second and last phase of artifacts publication. When your staging repository satisfies all requirements, you'll be allowed to release it. If not automated as a part of deployment process (see the section above), it can also be done manually via OSSRH. Once the release is done, it can take a couple of hours for a new artifact to become public.

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